The Great Journey in Photography

Hurry Up and Wait

Iconic Bald Eagle Pose

420mm f6.3 400iso 1/1,000sec

If you compare today’s photo with the one from last week you will see there is very little difference yet it changes the photograph a lot. I like both of them but both have challenges to process. I have already done a lot about processing photos so I won’t say much about that today, rather lets take a look at the stats about making those photographs. I will call it “the series”. For me the series is a number of photographs I make having set up on one bird in one place. As I move around, in and out and different angles and aspects, it is all part of the series. So this series was 24 images and about 7 minutes in duration. Short by my standards, there are times when a series can be hundreds of images lasting for more than an hour. After a few months it can be hard to put the details into proper context and the series mindset helps organize things. For example, in this series the bird may have flown off or I might have moved on to a more promising scene as it looks as though the light was getting harsh. To help preserve the context of the moment you might consider not deleting all of those forgettable images, you know like the empty perch or the out of focus back half of the bird as these will often jog your memory of the events. In this case it was a combination of things that made me pull up the sticks, I was a little further away than I wanted to be, angle to the sun was off a bit, the sunlight was becoming harsh, and there were other Eagles in the vicinity. By the way, if anyone gets clued in to the EXIF data for these images you can note that the timestamp is incorrect. I really don’t concern myself with the time of capture, date is important but with time zone changes and all that I just don’t rely on a time stamp at all.

Like I said, I like both photos, last weeks was nice because it had some action, the old head throw as this Eagle was chatting up a storm. It is a little awkward though, the angle is a bit off in relation to the sunlight and it casts a harsh shadow across the head. Today’s photo is nice too, it is the iconic Eagle pose with an almost perfect (best possible) angle to the sun. As you can see though, just a couple of minutes further along, the sunlight on this bird is getting really harsh, just short of being unusable.

So that is just a little glimpse of what happens behind the scenes, super exciting right!

You can keep up with all the action by following me on twitter @RonBoyd

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